Kids Library Home

Welcome to the Kids' Library!

Search for books, movies, music, magazines, and more.

     
Available items only
E-Books/E-Docs
Author Mynott, Colin.

Title Lean product development : a manager's guide / Colin Mynott.

Imprint London : Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2012.

Copies

Location Call No. OPAC Message Status
 Axe Books 24x7 Engineering E-Book  Electronic Book    ---  Available
Description 1 online resource (227 pages).
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series IET management of technology series ; 28
IET management of technology series ; 28.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 225-227) and index.
Contents Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction -- 1.1. What product development is all about -- 1.1.1. The purpose of product development -- 1.2. The discovery programme -- 1.3. And the Discoveries -- 1.4. The origin of products -- 1.5. Developing better products faster, at less cost -- 1.5.1. The need for a management guide -- 1.5.2. The purpose of this book -- 1.5.3. You need an effective route map and effective tools -- 1.5.4. Who needs it? -- 1.5.5. So where do you want to be? -- 2. Wealth creation in the economy -- 2.1. The origins of productivity performance -- 2.2. How PDMs create economic growth -- 2.3. Interdependency and what initiates growth -- 2.4. Why not invest more in product development? -- 2.5. What initiates economic activity: how do you feed it? -- 2.5.1. How you feed the growth mechanism -- 2.6. The financial effects of spending on Development rather than on Research -- 3. Your company's fortunes -- 3.1. Profit and product development -- 3.2. Product development: the way to generate wealth -- 3.3. The effect on sales and growth -- 3.4. Just manufacturing is not enough -- 3.5. Its strategic importance -- 3.6. Product development sets your potential productivity -- 3.7. What makes for effective product development -- 3.8. Give customers what they value -- 3.8.1. Generating fresh ideas -- 3.9. Developing the product -- 3.9.1. How you develop your capability -- 3.9.2. Your strategy -- 3.9.3. Your tactics -- 3.9.4. Should you do research as well as development? -- 3.9.5. Protecting intellectual property -- 3.10. The structured process -- 3.11. How much should you spend? -- 3.11.1. Downsizing -- 3.11.2. Private equity `turnarounds' -- 3.12. Information management -- 3.13. Your objective is financial -- 4. The product development process -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Product development process interactions -- 4.2.1. The pitfalls -- 4.3. 14 principles that minimise time and cost -- 5. Organising your company to increase profit -- 5.1. How you do it affects the cost of what you give your customer -- 5.2. Benchmarking -- 5.3. Improving your added value does not always add value -- 5.4. Most companies recycle tasks -- 5.5. Most companies batch the tasks, which queue -- 5.6. Relationship of manufacturing to product development -- 5.6.1. False investment justification -- 5.7. The lessons from the manufacturing area -- 5.8. The principles of flow activity -- 5.9. Organising to cut waste -- 5.10. Flow in product development -- 5.11. Being product-led -- 5.12. Changing to a team-based culture -- 5.12.1. What is culture? -- 5.12.2. Using teams -- 5.13. The remit of functions (departments) and teams -- 5.14. How teams work -- 5.15. Matching your team to the project -- 5.16. Setting up the development team for the project -- 5.16.1. Project champion and review group -- 5.16.2. Appoint a team leader -- 5.16.3. Developing project managers -- 5.16.4. Defining team responsibilities -- 5.16.5. The core team is appointed -- 5.16.6. Small core teams work best -- 5.16.7. Putting teams together -- 5.16.8. Purchasing and its control -- 5.16.9. Suppliers as team members -- 5.16.10. Customers -- 5.16.11. Training for the team -- 5.17. An example: what Malvern Instruments did -- 6. Product costing and company costs -- 6.1. What are the costs? -- 6.2. How do you calculate product cost? -- 6.3. The overheads of automation -- 6.4. Simplicity reduces the cost -- 6.5. How should you calculate manufacture cost? -- 6.5.1. The problem with current accounting systems -- 6.5.2. The important accounting aspects -- 6.6. How standard costing can lead to poor decisions -- 6.7. Costing as it could be -- 6.7.1. Summary -- costing the product-centred way -- 7. Product strategy -- 7.1. The products you make -- 7.1.1. Devising a strategy -- 7.2. Stick to your knitting -- 7.2.1. But continually increase your competencies -- 7.2.2. Technology road mapping -- 7.2.3. Your design and technology level and your strategy -- 7.2.4. Should you give customers exactly what they want? -- 7.3. Doing nothing may be high risk -- 7.3.1. Plan your route -- 7.4. Your ideas-generating mechanisms -- 7.4.1. Finding viable ideas -- 7.5. Generating product ideas -- 7.5.1. Internal company ideas -- 7.5.2. Ideas from customers and agents -- 7.5.3. Ideas from suppliers -- 7.5.4. Personnel policy -- 7.5.5. Licensing -- 7.5.6. Systematic desk research -- 7.5.7. Exhibitions -- 7.5.8. Think tanks and ideas groups -- 7.5.9. University research -- 7.5.10. New production technology and methods -- 7.5.11. Directories -- 7.6. Why do customers buy your product? -- 7.6.1. Comparing yourself with competitors -- 7.6.2. Perceived value -- .
7.7. Interaction with manufacturing strategy -- 7.7.1. How do the two interact? -- 7.7.2. Should you move manufacture to low labour-cost areas? -- 7.7.3. How can you cut your manufacture cost in the United Kingdom? -- 7.7.4. Consider alternative manufacturing strategies -- 7.7.5. Use product development to cut cost -- 7.8. Operational considerations -- 7.8.1. Incremental development -- your products' age profile -- 7.8.2. Is centralised development best? -- 7.8.3. What you learn from others -- 7.8.4. Effect of product strategy on sales growth -- 7.8.5. Share your strategy with that of your key suppliers -- 7.9. Devise and communicate your product strategy down the organisation -- 7.10. The key factors for a successful process -- 7.11. Your company's name -- 8. Planning your product programme -- 8.1. Why it's needed -- 8.1.1. What you do -- 8.2. How do you decide what to include in your programme? -- 8.3. Setting out your product programme -- 8.3.1. Define what you are offering the customer -- 8.3.2. Define the logic of your product architecture -- 8.3.3. Relate product architecture to timing -- 8.3.4. Continually update your product plan -- 8.3.5. Contingency planning -- 8.3.6. So how many products should you have in your programme? -- 8.3.7. Prioritise projects by their risk -- reward profile -- 8.4. Example: how TSS Limited continually update theirs -- 8.5. Further detail -- 9. The seven key project phases -- 9.1. Phase 1: Pre-development -- 9.1.1. Introduction -- 9.1.2. Is there a potential project? -- 9.1.3. The principles -- 9.1.4. Your initial, fast personal screening -- 9.1.5. Your second, more detailed, internal screening -- 9.1.6. Is the product technically feasible? -- 9.1.7. Potential income -- 9.1.8. Likely costs -- 9.1.9. Project timetable -- 9.1.10. The returns -- 9.1.11. Phase conclusion -- 9.2. Phase 2: Researching the project to make a quantified business case -- 9.2.1. Objectives and rationale -- 9.2.2. Staffing the project -- 9.2.3. The product -- 9.2.4. The product's feasibility: a more thorough assessment -- 9.2.5. Why do customers buy your product? -- 9.2.6. The marketing specification -- 9.2.7. Example: how TSS (UK) Limited assesses project viability -- 9.2.8. The business plan -- 9.2.9. Phase conclusion -- 9.3. Phase 3: Generating concepts -- 9.3.1. Why bother to do this? -- 9.3.2. Who does it -- 9.3.3. Customer perception -- 9.3.4. The principles of the concept phases -- 9.3.5. How you generate ideas -- 9.3.6. Testing and costing concepts -- 9.3.7. The background development programme -- 9.3.8. Presenting and reviewing concepts -- 9.3.9. Summary -- 9.3.10. Protecting ideas -- 9.3.11. Phase conclusion -- 9.4. Phase 4: Optimising and trialling the concept -- 9.4.1. Developing the optimum concept -- 9.4.2. Concept design and proving -- 9.4.3. Achieving design robustness -- 9.4.4. Phase conclusion -- 9.4.5. The advantages of well-resourced concept work -- 9.4.6. Toyota `set-based' development -- 9.5. Phase 5: The launch specification -- 9.5.1. Fixing the product launch specification -- 9.6. Phase 6: Detail design, plant installation and commissioning -- 9.6.1. The principal features of detailed design -- 9.6.2. The essentials are to make the product attractive -- 9.6.3. Simplicity of detail is vital but difficult -- 9.6.4. Safety aspects -- 9.6.5. The significance of suppliers' contribution -- 9.6.6. Manufacturing instructions -- 9.6.7. Final production engineering; plant acquisition and commissioning -- 9.7. Phase 7: Early production and confirmation trials -- 9.7.1. Confirming product performance -- 9.7.2. The transition between product development and production -- 9.7.3. Post-launch activities -- 10. Running and managing the programme -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Project management -- 10.3. The operating model -- 10.4. The programme -- priority and targets -- 10.4.1. Your company's financial model -- 10.4.2. Balancing priorities -- 10.5. Controlling the project by reviews -- 10.5.1. Phase reviews -- 10.5.2. Concurrent operation -- 10.6. How many reviews and phases? -- 10.7. Aspects of financial control -- 10.7.1. Using IRR to assess project viability -- 10.7.2. Computing the IRR -- 10.8. Conclusion: continuous development -- pt. A Programme control reviews -- 10a.1. The review meeting -- 10a.1.1. Scrutinise at each review -- 10a.2. Review questions and transfer criteria -- 10a.2.1. Transfer criteria -- pt. B Managing multiple projects -- 10b.1. Why multi-project management is important -- 10b.1.1. Lower costs and speed are the drivers -- 10b.2. How it affects sales growth -- 10b.3. Multiple project organisation -- department or matrix? -- .
Note continued: 10b.4. The dangers of bottlenecks -- 10b.5. Component strategy and background development -- 10b.6. An operating example -- 10b.7. Implications for staffing -- 10b.8. Further detail -- pt. C Risk assessment -- 10c.1. Scope and application -- 10c.1.1. Relationship between risk, project size and number of phases and reviews -- 10c.1.2. Process -- 10c.2. Risk assessment -- 10c.3. Quantification -- 10c.3.1. Explanation of terms -- 10c.4. Computing programme risk -- 10c.4.1. Very low risk -- 10c.4.2. Low risk -- 10c.4.3. High risk -- 10c.4.4. Unacceptable risk -- 10c.5. Further information -- 11. Tools and techniques -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.1.1. The tools and techniques that help you cut time and cost -- what they enable you to do -- 11.1.2. Contents of the chapter -- 11.2. Quality function deployment -- 11.2.1. Origins -- 11.2.2. Introduction -- 11.2.3. The benefits -- 11.2.4. The process -- 11.3. Concurrent (simultaneous) engineering -- 11.4. Team working -- 11.4.1. Company culture -- 11.5. Incremental innovation -- 11.5.1. Radical innovation versus incremental -- 11.6. Brainstorming -- generating ideas -- 11.7. Pugh concept selection -- 11.8. Functional cost analysis -- 11.9. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) -- 11.10. Cause and effect analysis -- 11.11. Five whys -- 11.12. Pokayoke -- 11.13. Weibull analysis -- 11.14. Process capability -- 11.15. Statistical process control -- 11.15.1. Six Sigma -- 11.16. Taguchi methodology and robust design -- 11.16.1. Robust performance and designed experiments -- 11.17. Computer tools -- 11.17.1. Computer-aided drafting -- 11.17.2. Parametric CAD in the design process -- 11.17.3. `Knowledge-based' systems (`intelligent' CAD) -- 11.17.4. Computer-aided engineering -- 11.17.5. Further advice -- 11.17.6. Manufacturing process simulation -- 11.17.7. Project control -- 11.18. `Design for X' -- 11.18.1. Design for manufacture and assembly (DFMA) -- 11.19. Low-cost tooling and models -- 11.20. Rapid prototyping -- 11.20.1. Understand the processes involved -- 11.20.2. Troubles with rapid prototypes -- 11.21. Engineering data sources -- 11.22. Identifying process waste -- 11.22.1. What is the PD equivalent to the Toyota production process? -- 11.22.2. Design structure matrix analysis -- 11.22.3. Caveats -- 12. Bibliography.
Summary This book is about how you manage the business process of developing products from strategy through design, to testing and service feedback. You can apply it to manufactured and service products, whether completely new or just a minor change. It's not an instruction manual on tools and techniques. These are explained in Chapter 11; Chapter 12 gives references on their detail.
Subject New products -- Management.
Production planning.
Product management.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Development -- Business Development.
New products -- Management. (OCoLC)fst01036904
Product management. (OCoLC)fst01078225
Production planning. (OCoLC)fst01078339
lean production.
product design.
product development.
production testing.
Genre/Form Electronic books.
Added Author Institution of Engineering and Technology.
Other Form: Print version: Mynott, Colin. Lean Product Development. 2012. Stevenage : Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2012 9781849196710 (OCoLC)827954649
ISBN 9781849196727 (electronic bk.)
1849196729 (electronic bk.)
9781621985723 (electronic bk.)
1621985725 (electronic bk.)
9781849196710 (hbk.)
1849196710 (hbk.)
Standard No. AU@ 000050544559
AU@ 000052935783
DEBBG BV041053085
DEBSZ 423742620
NZ1 15029216
NZ1 16175281

 
    
Available items only