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Author Cashdollar, Kenneth L., author.

Title Recommendations for a new rock dusting standard to prevent coal dust explosions in intake airways / Kenneth L. Cashdollar, Michael J. Sapko, Eric S. Weiss, Chi-Keung Man, Samuel P. Harteis, and Gregory M. Green.

Imprint Pittsburgh, PA : Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, 2010.

Copies

Location Call No. OPAC Message Status
 Axe Fed Docs - Online Documents  HE 20.7131:9679    ---  Available
Description 1 online resource ([59] pages) : illustrations.
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Report of investigations ; 9679
DHHS (NIOSH) publication ; no. 2010-151
Report of investigations (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) ; 9679.
DHHS publication ; no. (NIOSH) 2010-151.
System Details Mode of access: Internet at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health web site.
Note Title from title screen (viewed on June 14, 2010).
"May 2010."
Summary "The workings of a bituminous coal mine produce explosive coal dust for which adding rock dust can reduce the potential for explosions. Accordingly, guidelines have been established by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) about the relative proportion of rock dust that must be present in a mine's intake and return airways. Current MSHA regulations require that intake airways contain at least 65% incombustible content and return airways contain at least 80% incombustible content. The higher limit for return airways was set in large part because finer coal dust tends to collect in these airways. Based on extensive in-mine coal dust particle size surveys and large-scale explosion tests, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends a new standard of 80% total incombustible content (TIC) be required in the intake airways of bituminous coal mines in the absence of methane. MSHA inspectors routinely monitor rock dust inerting efforts by collecting dust samples and measuring the percentage of TIC, which includes measurements of the moisture in the samples, the ash in the coal, and the rock dust. These regulations were based on two important findings: a survey of coal dust particle size that was performed in the 1920s, and large-scale explosion tests conducted in the U.S. Bureau of Mines' Bruceton Experimental Mine (BEM) using dust particles of that survey's size range to determine the amount of inerting material required to prevent explosion propagation. Mining technology and practices have changed considerably since the 1920s, when the original coal dust particle survey was performed. Also, it has been conclusively shown that as the size of coal dust particles decreases, the explosion hazard increases. Given these factors, NIOSH and MSHA conducted a joint survey to determine the range of coal particle sizes found in dust samples collected from intake and return airways of U.S. coal mines. Results from this survey show that the coal dust found in mines today is much finer than in mines of the 1920s. This increase in fine dust is presumably due to the increase in mechanization. In light of this recent comprehensive dust survey, NIOSH conducted additional large-scale explosion tests at the Lake Lynn Experimental Mine (LLEM) to determine the degree of rock dusting necessary to abate explosions. The tests used Pittsburgh seam coal dust blended as 38% minus 200 mesh and referred to as medium-sized dust. This medium-sized blend was used to represent the average of the finest coal particle size collected from the recent dust survey. Explosion tests indicate that medium-sized coal dust required 76.4% TIC to prevent explosion propagation. Even the coarse coal dust (20% minus 200 mesh or 75 microm), representative of samples obtained from mines in the 1920s, required approximately 70% TIC to be rendered inert in the larger LLEM, a level higher than the current regulation of 65% TIC. Given the results of the extensive in-mine coal dust particle size surveys and large-scale explosion tests, NIOSH recommends a new standard of 80% TIC be required in the intake airways of bituminous coal mines in the absence of methane. The survey results indicate that in some cases there are no substantial differences between the coal dust particle size distributions in return and intake air courses in today's coal mines. The survey results indicate that the current requirement of 80% TIC in return airways is still appropriate in the absence of background methane."--NIOSHTIC-2.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 23-26).
Note Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (CDC, viewed November 8, 2016).
Subject Coal mines and mining -- Dust control -- United States.
Coal mines and mining -- United States -- Safety measures.
Mine ventilation -- United States -- Equipment and supplies.
Mine explosions -- United States -- Prevention.
Mineral dusts -- United States.
Coal mines and mining -- Dust control. (OCoLC)fst00865369
Coal mines and mining -- Safety measures. (OCoLC)fst00865441
Mine explosions -- Prevention. (OCoLC)fst01022043
Mine ventilation -- Equipment and supplies. (OCoLC)fst01022198
Mineral dusts. (OCoLC)fst01022213
United States. (OCoLC)fst01204155
Genre/Form Online resources.
Online resources.
Added Author Green, Gregory M.
Harteis, Samuel P.
Man, Chi-Keung.
Sapko, M. J.
Weiss, E. S. (Eric S.)
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Office for Mine Safety and Health Research, issuing body.
Other Form: Print version: Cashdollar, Kenneth L. Recommendations for a new rock dusting standard to prevent coal dust explosions in intake airways (DLC) 2013464299 (OCoLC)893202421
Gpo Item No. 0499-F-22 (online)
Sudoc No. HE 20.7131:9679

 
    
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